Prof Luke Bisby

Arup Professor of Fire and Structures and Head of Research Institute

Email: 

Telephone: 

+44(0)131 6505710

Location: 

William Rankine

Engineering Discipline: 

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering

Research Institute: 

  • Infrastructure and Environment

Research Theme: 

  • Fire Safety Engineering
Professor Luke Bisby
Professor Luke Bisby

Academic Qualifications: 

  • PhD, Structural Engineering, Queen's University (Canada), 2003
  • MSc (Eng), Structural Engineering, Queen's University (Canada), 1999
  • BEng, Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University, 1997

Teaching: 

Engineering Education

I have an ongoing interest in improving student ownership of and engagement in education in engineering, and have been involved in various engineering design, professional skills development, and curriculum reform initiatives.

Research Interests: 

Structural Uses of Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP)

Fibre reinforced polymers represent a relatively new class of materials being used both for new construction and for repair of reinforced concrete, steel, timber, and masonry structures. My specific interests are related to concrete column strengthening with FRP wraps, flexural and shear strengthening with near surface mounted (NSM) FRPs, cold regions durability of FRP strengthening systems, and fire performance and design of FRP reinforcement and strengthening systems for concrete.

Structural Response to Fire

In the wake of several high-profile, large-scale structural collapses due to fire, the structural fire safety engineering community has identified a number of key areas in which current knowledge is lacking and where research is needed, both for existing structures and for the next generation of infrastructure. In particular, structural engineers are now expected to provide increased structural integrity in fire to resist collapse (by considering behaviour in fire as an integral part of the design process) and to develop more rational and reliable methods to predict and prevent failures due to multiple hazards (including fire).

Thermal Effects on Structures and Structural Materials

Scientists and engineers are developing and implementing new materials and systems for repair of aging infrastructure as well as for new construction. The performance of these novel systems in fire must be verified. Furthermore, the fire performance of conventional construction materials also remains incompletely understood. I am interested in further developing our understanding of the thermal and mechanical response of construction materials and systems, both conventional and innovative, to high temperatures and fire, and in doing so enabling fire-safe application of innovations for the ongoing repair and renewal of infrastructure.