All Research Projects

All research projects at the School of Engineering. You can search keywords within Project title and filter by Research Institute or Research Theme.

We also have many exciting Engineering PhD Opportunities for postgraduate students looking to join the School.

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  • The modelling of cohesive soils is a challenging task of great importance in many earth moving processes. In these cases, the understanding of the interaction soil-machine is vital to try to optimize the process and avoid problems. This project aims to investigate the capabilities of DEM cohesive contact models to capture with a sufficient level of accuracy the mechanical behaviours involved in soil-machine interactions.

    Research Themes: 

    • Granular Mechanics and Industrial Infrastructure
    DEM simulations of cone penetration tests
  • DTOcean is a European collaborative project funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Development, more specifically under the call ENERGY 2013-1.

    Research Themes: 

    • Offshore Renewable Energy
    DTOcean logo
  • Mud, slurry, coffee, paints, cements, batteries and many other everyday materials have particles suspended in a liquid. We need to understand the flow behaviour to handle, and process such materials for traditional and innovative applications. Our research seeks to understand the common features of the flow behaviour of different materials using simple particle based simulations. In particular, we focus on dense suspensions where the particles occupy more than 50 % by volume of the solution.

    Research Themes: 

    • Granular Mechanics and Industrial Infrastructure
    DEM simulation of shear flow of particle suspension
  • The increasing amounts of renewable energy present on the national grid reduce C02 emissions caused by electrical power but they fit into an electrical grid designed for fossil fuels. Fossil fuels can be turned on and off at will and so are very good at matching variations in load. Renewable energy in the form of wind turbines is more variable (although that variability is much more predictable than most people think) and there is a need for existing power plants to operate much more flexibly to accommodate the changing power output from wind, tidal and solar power.

    Research Themes: 

    • Power Systems
  • Miss Underwood's doctoral research seeks to develop and test new nano-composite materials for the use in water treatment. She wishes to improve upon the existing nano zero-valent iron technologies as well as to explore how specific nanotechnologies can be applied in an economic and incentivized fashion for successful technological adoption.

    Research Themes: 

    • Environmental Engineering
  • This project is aimed to develop a novel process for producing ultrapure hydrogen from synthesis gas originating from coal gasification. The coal-to-H2 process is integrated with a pre-combustion carbon capture process for de-carbonising the syngas and the integration results in improving H2 yield at the H2 Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA).

    Research Themes: 

    • Carbon Capture and Separation Processes
    Design of a twelve-column Hydrogen production Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) process
  • To address the need for effective vis response photocatalysts, we have synthesised WO3 and TiO2 nanowires to provide a fast transport channel for the photo-generated electrons which can retard the charge recombination. We are working on improving the visible activity of the catalysts through modifying the nanocomposites using metal (Ag, W, V, Fe, Ni) and non-metal (C, N, B, S) elements, and through the control over the microstructure or even over the crystal phase.

    Research Themes: 

    • Energy and Climate Change
    Photocatalysis laboratory equipment
  • Cryptosporidium is a waterborne microorganism which causes severe diarrhoea and can be fatal for immuno-compromised individuals, infants and young children. It is estimated that Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water results in 250-500 million cases each year in developing countries and 60,000 in the UK alone. The Cryptosporidium organism has a thick outer wall that is resistant to many conventional water treatment methods, and outbreaks are a problem even in the developed world, negatively impacting population health and economic development - daily monitoring of the water supply is required.

    Current Cryptosporidium detection methods are expensive and highly time-consuming - requiring microscopic examination by skilled scientists. Furthermore, these techniques lack species and viability information, which is essential to make well-informed public health decisions. There is, therefore, a pressing need for an instrument capable of rapidly analysing drinking water samples for the presence, species and viability of Cryptosporidium microorganisms.

    Research Themes: 

    • Sensors
  • Nova Innovation and IES are collaborating to design, build and test a direct drive generator for Nova’s tidal current turbine.

    Research Themes: 

    • Electrical Power Conversion
    Nova logo

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