Sensors

Sensors Research Theme

Date: 

Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 08:30 to 17:00

Location: 

John McIntyre Centre, Pollock Halls of Residence, 18 Holyrood Park Road, Edinburgh, EH16 5AY

Event Contact Name: 

Event Contact Email: 

John McIntyre Centre

Full Job Title: 

Postgraduate

Engineering Discipline: 

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Electronics and Electrical Engineering

Research Institute: 

  • Digital Communications

Email: 

Yuan Chen is a PhD student with the Agile Tomography Group, University of Edinburgh.

On Wednesday 28 November, staff welcomed alumnus David Gow back to the School of Engineering to celebrate his pioneering career in prosthetics ahead of his honorary graduation at the McEwan Hall.

(L-R) Eddie Monteith, David Gow and Head of School Conchúr Ó Brádaigh

Professor Timothy Drysdale was recently recognised for his pioneering work in remote laboratories for undergraduate engineering teaching. Having won the National Instruments Engineering Impact Award for Education in the Europe, Middle East and Asia region, he now goes forward to the international final in May 2019, in Austin, Texas.

Professor Tim Drysdale receives National Instruments Engineering Impact Award

On Monday 3rd September 2018, the School’s first commemorative plaques were unveiled to celebrate the achievements of three outstanding alumni, and the School’s first ever Regius Professor.

Pip Ayton (Women in Engineering) alongside Ian and Douglas Fergusson, nephews of Molly Fergusson, one of the commemorated alumni

Closing Date: 

Monday, December 31, 2018

Technical Background

Date: 

Wednesday, August 8, 2018 - 12:30

Location: 

Conference room 1:03, Scottish Microelectronics Centre

Event Contact Name: 

Katrina I. Saridakis

Event Contact Email: 

Dr Sara Ghoreishizadeh portrait

Closing Date: 

Friday, August 31, 2018

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most malignant primary brain tumour.The aim of this project is to develop and test a range of biocompatible sensors – amenable to neurosurgical implantation – that can detect tumour regrowth in near-real time and with high spatial resolution. 

Closing Date: 

Friday, August 31, 2018

Sensing the complex impedance of biological material such as cells or tissue, in-vivo or in the lab, is a powerful technique which has a long history in biomedical engineering. A recent PhD project at the University of Edinburgh has demonstrated the application of impedance sensing in cell based studies of disease models in retinal and liver cells. This PhD project would follow up on this promising work to develop new methods for applying impedance sensing in biomedical applications.

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