Inaugural Lecture of Professor Conchúr Ó Brádaigh, Chair of Engineering Materials

Location: 

Lecture Theatre A, James Clerk Maxwell Building, The King's Buildings

Date: 

Tuesday, May 16, 2017 - 17:30 to 18:30

The Inaugural Lecture of Professor Conchúr Ó Brádaigh, Chair of Engineering Materials will be held at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 16th May 2017 in Lecture Theatre A, James Clerk Maxwell Building, The King’s Buildings.

The Lecture is open to the public, and all staff, students and guests are welcome to attend the Lecture. Please confirm attendance by email to: louise.farquharson@ed.ac.uk

 

Lightweight Composite Materials

How Far and How Fast?

Lightweight composite materials, composed of polymers reinforced by advanced fibres made of carbon, glass and polymers, have come a long way since they were first introduced in the US space industry in the 1960s. Today, we have substantially carbon fibre composite passenger aircraft (Boeing Dreamliner, Airbus A-350, Bombardier C-Series), electric/hybrid automobile bodies (BMW i-series), and super yachts with composite masts of more than 90m height.  High performance composites are used for the blades of wind and tidal turbines, as well as for human bone and spinal fixation devices.  The main drivers for the lightweight composites revolution are the need to increase fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse-gas emissions in transport, to generate renewable energy more cost-effectively and to increase performance and personal protection in security, defence, sports and leisure applications. 

 

The speed and limits of composites penetration into transport, energy, infrastructure and consumer sectors will depend on development of lower cost, higher-volume manufacturing processes and on improved fire-resistance, repair and end-of-life strategies for these complex materials.  There may be limits on the mechanical properties that can be industrially achieved with advanced microscale fibres, while the much-vaunted nanoscale reinforcements (e.g. carbon nanotubes) have so far failed to deliver on their promise of a step-change in strength and stiffness.  Lower embodied energy and less reliance on fossil fuels for polymer and fibre feedstocks will also be necessary for long-term sustainability of composite materials.  

World’s largest wind turbine blade for an 8MW turbine, 88.4m long, manufactured in glass fibre reinforced epoxy
World’s largest wind turbine blade for an 8MW turbine, 88.4m long, manufactured in glass fibre reinforced epoxy

Event Contact Name: 

Louise Farquharson

Event Contact Email: